A few X-Rays; Gabriel’s spin

Finally, a few images of Gabriel‘s spinal issue. We are still working the images from the MRI, but I’m hoping these x-rays help show the uphill battle we have been fighting.

As described before, Gabriel has a herniated discs between his L1 & L2. The dog‘s spine is broke into 3 different section from head to behind (L1, L2, L3). What a herniated disc means is the disc protecting and supporting the spinal cord is damaged. The damage of a disc has ranged. Gabriel’s disc is severely damaged and is pushing against his spinal cord.

A dog’s spinal cord is very similar to ours (humans). We, humans, have discs that protect and support our spinal cord the same as a dog. The spinal cord transfers all of our bodily function from head to toes — same as a dog’s.  This is why any injury to our spinal cord or its protective layer is critical. Any disturbance no matter how small we can lose the ability to move.

Below are some images are Gabriel’s x-ray. These x-rays show us his herniated disc, but also other problematic discs. These problematic disc could led to additional herniated discs.

Exhibit 1:

Exhibit 1 A –

During the break-down stage  of disc, a calcium build up occurs which causes various issues. In this image the calcium build up is pushing up against the spinal cord causing brainwaves not to make it to other parts of the body. From disc A to the right is where the dysfunction is occurring. The calcium buildup is shown by where the end of the red arrow is pointing.

Exhibit 1 B –

The disc shown here is a healthy disc. You can see that there is no distortion in the x-ray. This is shown by the ‘black’ around where the red arrow is pointing.

Exhibit 1 C –

Both C red arrows are pointing to the ribs.

Exhibit 2:


Exhibit 2 A –

The arrow is pointing to the herniated disc.  The discs on either side of the “A” are normal healthy discs.

Exhibit 2 B –

The red arrow is pointing to the dogs intestines

Exhibit 2 C –

Both C red arrows are pointing to the ribs.

Exhibit 2 Head –

The arrow is pointing to the direction of the Gabe’s head. The opposite direction is to the Gabe’s tail.

(Last Image)

Exhibit 3

Exhibit 3 A –

The arrow is pointing to a compressed disc that may cause an issue as the Gabriel ages. It is common to find more than one herniated disc.  The discs on either side of the “A” are normal healthy discs.

Exhibit 3 B –

The red arrow is pointing to the Gabe’s hip/hip joints

Exhibit 3 C –

Both C red arrows are pointing to the ribs.

Exhibit 3 Herniated Disc

The arrow is pointing to the direction of the Gabriel’s herniated disc.

____________________________________________________________________________________

I hope the images and explanations above help you understand the difficultly and discomfort Gabriel is dealing with. A herniated disc is not an uncommon thing in veterinarian medicine.  Any wrong step or missed jump can cause a disturbance on the disc. In Gabriel’s case, the herniated disc has been deteriorating over time. This may indicate a family bloodline issue or just something that happens. The acupuncture treatments have been helping Gabriel tremendously. I have posted about our acupuncture visits in previous blogs.

Once, we figure out how to convert the MRI images to jpegs or another image format. I will post them up. These images will actually show the disc compression on the spinal. And you will see how lucky we are that Gabriel is walking and that he does not need surgery until we reach a more critical stage.

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Author: MamaTrek

I'm a runner, hiker, mother, wife and owner of two wonderful German Shepherds. I have been hiking with my daughter since she was 6 months old. She has summited 25 mountains over 4,000ft, including Mt. Washington in NH. I've have ran over a dozen half marathons and numerous shorter distance. I have taken my little one on many long distance training runs. Some where between all that I graduated with a BSBA in Marketing, Management and Information Technology.

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